ZINC OXIDE

Manuka honey is best for blemished skin.

Scientific name: zinc oxide

Inorganic compound:  mined or synthetic

 

 


BEST FOR ALL SKIN TYPES, ESPECIALLY SENSITIVE 

FEATURES

  • non-toxic
  • UVA and UVB protecting
  • anti-microbial
  • vulnerary
  • anti-irritant
  • non-allergenic

BENEFITS

  • safe
  • sun protection
  • cleansing
  • wound-healing
  • soothing
  • de-odorizing

FUNCTION

  • colorant
  • sunscreen

(CI 77947): an inorganic chemical compound found in nature as zincite. Refined zinc oxide is used in cosmetics as a white pigment, and is highly prized as a nonchemical sunscreen. It is also regarded as anti-microbial, wound-healing, and protects, heals and soothes the skin while acting as a physical UV barrier against the sun and other irritants. Approved for use in cosmetics in the U.S., E.U. and Japan. However, Be Yourself Beautiful does not approve of the inclusion of nano-sized zinc oxide in cosmetic formulations.

Zinc oxide is an inorganic compound with the formula ZnO. ZnO is a white powder that is insoluble in water, and it is widely used as an additive in numerous materials and products including rubbers, plastics, ceramics, glass, cement, lubricants,[2] paints, ointments, adhesives, sealants, pigments, foods (source of Zn nutrient), batteries, ferrites, fire retardants, and first-aid tapes. It occurs naturally as the mineral zincite, but most zinc oxide is produced synthetically.[3]

Zinc compounds were probably used by early humans, in processed and unprocessed forms, as a paint or medicinal ointment, but their composition is uncertain. The use of pushpanjan, probably zinc oxide, as a salve for eyes and open wounds, is mentioned in the Indian medical text the Charaka Samhita, thought to date from 500 BC or before.[39] Zinc oxide ointment is also mentioned by the Greek physician Dioscorides (1st century AD.)[40]Avicenna mentions zinc oxide in The Canon of Medicine (1025 AD), which mentioned it as a preferred treatment for a variety of skin conditions, including skin cancer. Though it is no longer used for treating skin cancer, it is still widely used to treat a variety of other skin conditions, in products such as baby powder and creams against diaper rashescalamine cream, anti-dandruff shampoos, and antiseptic ointments.[41]

Medicine

Zinc oxide as a mixture with about 0.5% iron(III) oxide (Fe2O3) is called calamine and is used in calamine lotion. Two minerals, zincite and hemimorphite, have been historically called calamine. When mixed with eugenol, a ligandzinc oxide eugenol is formed, which has applications as a restorative and prosthodontic in dentistry.[9][51]

Reflecting the basic properties of ZnO, fine particles of the oxide have deodorizing and antibacterial[52] properties and for that reason are added into materials including cotton fabric, rubber, oral care products,[53][54] and food packaging.[55][56] Enhanced antibacterial action of fine particles compared to bulk material is not exclusive to ZnO and is observed for other materials, such as silver.[57] This property is due to the increased surface area of the fine particles.

Zinc oxide is widely used to treat a variety of other skin conditions, in products such as baby powder and barrier creams to treat diaper rashescalamine cream, anti-dandruff shampoos, and antiseptic ointments.[41][58] It is also a component in tape (called "zinc oxide tape") used by athletes as a bandage to prevent soft tissue damage during workouts.[59]

Zinc oxide can be used in ointments, creams, and lotions to protect against sunburn and other damage to the skin caused by ultraviolet light (see sunscreen). It is the broadest spectrum UVA and UVB reflector that is approved for use as a sunscreen by the FDA,[60] and is completely photostable.[61] When used as an ingredient in sunscreen, zinc oxide blocks both UVA (320–400 nm) and UVB (280–320 nm) rays of ultraviolet light. Zinc oxide and the other most common physical sunscreentitanium dioxide, are considered to be nonirritating, nonallergenic, and non-comedogenic.[62] Zinc oxide is, however, slightly absorbed into the skin [63]

Nanoparticles

Many sunscreens use nanoparticles of zinc oxide (along with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide) because such small particles do not scatter light and therefore do not appear white. There has been concern that they might be absorbed into the skin,[64][65] and a study published in 2010 found that nanoparticles of ZnO that were applied to human skin via sunscreens could be traced in venous blood and urine samples.[66] In contrast, a comprehensive review of the medical literature from 2011 says that no evidence of systemic absorption can be found in the literature.[67][68]

Pigment

Zinc white is used as a pigment in paints and is more opaque than lithopone, but less opaque than titanium dioxide.[3] It is also used in coatings for paper. Chinese white is a special grade of zinc white used in artists' pigments. It is also a main ingredient of mineral makeup.[70]